Diseases and Disorders/Diagnosis & Treatment | Physiotherapy | Health Tips | FAQ's | Enquiry | Contact us
 
  Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ's)

Arthritis
01.
Am I at risk for developing arthritis?
A.
The following is a list of risk factors:
  • Obesity can cause unneeded stress on joints.
  • Aging can hinder cartilage’s ability to repair itself.
  • Following a healthy diet will help build strong bones.
  • Genetic factors, diseases, and hereditary factors such as bone dysplasias.
  • Injury or deformity of a joint that is not properly aligned.
  • Occupational factors such as repetitive tasks, and overworking and tiring muscles that surround the joint.
02.
Where can arthritis affect my body?
A.
Arthritis can be found in any joint within the human body, which is anywhere that the ends of two or more bones meet. Arthritis is most often diagnosed in one of these three types: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or post-traumatic arthritis. The most common form is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis mainly affects weightbearing joints such as the knee, hip or spine.
03.
Should I exercise if I have arthritis?
A.
Exercising can still be beneficial even after you are diagnosed with arthritis. Depending on where your arthritis is occurring, exercise will sometimes be recommended as a form of treatment. Exercise can increase your range of motion and flexibility as well as strengthen your muscles.
04.
Will I develop arthritis from a preexisting injury?
A.
There are many different types of arthritis that can be found in adults and in some instances children. Arthritis is seen mainly as people age, but can start from an injury incurred at a young age or overuse. Injuries involving fractures, ligaments, or meniscus tears could lead to arthritis years later.
Hip & Knee Replacement
01.
What can I do to avoid knee or hip replacement surgery?
A.
Depending on your situation some suggestions from your doctor might be weight loss, anti-inflammatory medication, braces, orthotics, steroid injections, physical therapy, etc.
02.
When should I consider knee or hip replacement?
A.
You should start to consider surgery when you have exhausted all other forms of treatment and your pain has started to interfere with everyday activities. In addition to your pain your doctor will be able to tell you if your loss of cartilage is great or if there has been damage done to your bones and joints. After discussions your primary care physician will further direct you to an orthopaedic surgeon to discuss surgical procedures.
03.
What type of exercising is recommended after surgery?
A.
Full recovery from hip or knee replacement surgery can take 3-6 months according to your situation. For hip and knee replacements a physical therapist will recommend range of motion exercises, strengthening exercises, balancing exercises as well as proper techniques to use for everyday activities.
Bone Fractures
01.
What is the difference between a fractured bone and a broken bone?
A.
There is no difference. A fractured bone is a broken bone. A fractured bone can be partially or completely broken. Partially or completely fractured the bone is still a broken bone. If the bone breaks through the skin it is called an open or compound fracture. If the bone breaks and does not break the skin it is called a closed or simple fracture.
02.
Will regular exercise prevent broken bones?
A.
Exercise combined with adequate amounts of calcium in your diet can help make your bones strong. For women and children it is especially important to get enough calcium. Women produce less estrogen after menopause, which regulates calcium intake, and children need calcium to build strong bones while they are still growing.
03.
Do all broken bones cause pain and limit everyday activity?
A.
Some broken bones will not limit your activity, but cause you pain. In this case it is important to see your doctor for x-rays. Only x-rays and a doctor’s physical exam can detect a broken bone.
Amputees
01.
Are there ways to prevent amputation?
A.
Amputations can stem from extreme accidents. In some accident cases the limb can be reattached depending on which body part was affected, the condition of the amputated limb, the time it happened relative to the time that person receives medical care, and the overall health of that person. People with diabetes can also be at risk of amputation. Complications from diabetes can result in amputation that can be prevented by using protective or custom molded shoes.
02.
What types of therapy are available?
A.
Healing can take anywhere from 3 to 12 weeks, or more depending on the patients health. After people go through an amputation they will most likely need physical therapy as well as counseling. Speak with your doctor about physical rehabilitation procedures and what counseling services he/she recommends.
03.
Will my prosthesis cause skin irritation?
A.
The best thing to do after amputation in order to avoid skin irritation is to take preventive steps:
  • Make sure to wash your residual limb with soap and water once daily or more if you sweat a lot or are treating a rash or infection.
  • Make sure to wash anything that comes in contact with your skin with soap and water and then dry according to instructions.
  • Use moderate amounts of lotion to keep from becoming too dry and do not use lotion that has alcohol in it because it might cause your skin to crack and cause infection.
  • Maintain your correct prosthetic fit and if any redness develops get it refitted before it turns into a sore.
  • Wear a shoe that works well with the prosthesis to achieve perfect alignment.
  • Make sure you eat healthy and get enough water; if you are diabetic watch your glucose level.
If you experience loss of sensation remove prosthetic and check for pressure sores. Despite your efforts you may develop a sore or irritation. Talk to your doctor for treatment recommendations.
Lower Back Pain
01.
Is back pain related to weak muscles or a more serious problem?
A.
Low back pain can happen because your ligaments and muscles are weak or worn out from repeated work. Discs can then become weakened and lead to a slipped disc or bulging disc caused by heavy lifting or a sudden fall. Most back pain is due to degeneration of the spine caused by aging and abuse.
02.
How can I prevent low back pain and avoid surgery?
A.
Most back related injuries will not require surgery. Back pain related to muscle or ligament strain will normally heal within a short amount of time. Maintaining good physical shape, good posture, healthy weight and using correct form when lifting heavy objects is vital to decreasing lower back pain. Staying active and using an inflammatory drug can help you deal with temporary back pain. Chronic back pain might require a strength training program and chronic pain treatment. Talk to your physician or a physical therapist.
03.
Is my back pain related to osteoporosis?
A.
Repeated stress placed on your back over a number of years can lead to chronic lower back pain. This chronic pain could just be due to degeneration of the bones, not necessarily osteoporosis. Bones most often affected by osteoporosis are within the spine - that is why it is very important to eat healthy and get enough calcium in your diet to prevent bone density loss.
Shoulder Injuries
01.
Is it necessary to take care of a shoulder injury right away?
A.
One common shoulder injury is dislocation; if your shoulder dislocates it can damage the tissues around the shoulder. A lot of times people become used to the pain and ignore it. After time, repeated trauma can severely injure your shoulder and cause a lot of pain. That is why it is important to get early treatment – some patients may have a recurrence if not treated.
02.
Will my injury require surgery?
A.
Shoulder instability problems will require surgery. The ligaments and capsules will be directly repaired. With proper muscle rehabilitation it will take approximately four to six months to heal completely.
03.
Do weak muscles cause shoulder instability?
A.
If patients get their shoulder checked out immediately after the injury occurs, surgery may be avoided by doing strength training exercises prescribed by your doctor. Shoulder strengthening exercises can prevent injury from occurring in the first place, but is especially important to do after the first minor occurrence.
To answer all of your questions, it is always best to consult with your physician.
  Orthopaedic Disorders
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Arthritis of the Knee
Meniscal Cartilage Tear
Defects of the Knee
 
  Testimonials
I wanted to thank you for removing the spurs on my hip and adding to the quality of my life. I really thought I was just getting old and there was nothing that could be done. I just want you to know you’re my new best friend.

Name

Visakhapatnam
Thank you for seeing me concerning my back injury. I have encountered many Physicians in my 40 years in health care but never anyone so incredible as you. The time you were willing to spend with me explaining in detail your evaluation, your compassion about the pain and your willingness to go beyond the back injury and point out that there was no signs of arthritis showing in my hip area.
Name
Visakhapatnam
I wanted to take a minute to say thank you for helping me get my life back! by knee replacement surgery)
Name
Visakhapatnam
Powered by www.kalyaninfotech.com
All Rights © www.drsivaji-ortho.com, All Rights Reserved